About Seville

Seville is the capital city of Andalusia. Located in the South of Spain, Seville, or Sevilla in Spanish, is one of the largest Spanish cities with over 700.000 inhabitants.

Seville occupies the valley of the Guadalquivir river. The river, with 60 navigable kilometres, was an important harbour during the Spanish conquest of the American continent. Silver and gold from the New World arrived to Sevilla through the river and were distributed throughout the country from here.

The city of Seville is famous worldwide for its culture, monuments, traditions and artistic heritage. This is the birthplace of Flamenco and the city where the most amazing Easter processions take place. But Seville is also the neuralgic centre of the South of Spain, a city full of life and possibilities.

Welcome to one of the most charming cities of Spain. Seville’s rich history has left the city stuffed with innumerable monuments like the awesome cathedral , the third largest in the world, the Giralda tower, the wonderful palace of the Reales Alcázares, the magical Barrio of Santa Cruz with its narrow streets, the Maestranza bullfighting ring and the passion for Flamenco an the perfume of orange blossoms on every corner.

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This enormous structure is like a little world on its own, and you will lose hours staring in awe at the beautiful architectural flourishes, relics and historical curios. With 80 different chapels it’s the largest cathedral in the world by volume and is a World Heritage site. There are also hints of the mosque that once stood on this spot, especially in the Court of the Orange trees on the north side, where Muslims once performed ablutions.

SEVILLE CATHEDRAL

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An enduring emblem for Seville, the Giralda is the bell-tower right next-door to the Cathedral, and you can purchase a ticket for both attractions. It has Moorish origins, being the minaret for the former mosque. What’s unusual about the tower is that 34 ramps lead to the top instead of a stairway. This was so that Muezzin who led the call to prayer could ride his horse up the tower instead of walking.

LA GIRALDA

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This is a marvellous UNESCO-listed palace complex that is still in use by the Spanish royal family: their chambers, state rooms and halls are on the upper level and can be viewed if you pay a little extra. Nearly all of the complex is in the Mudéjar style (Moorish-inspired architecture for non-Islamic buildings) and was developed by Pedro the Cruel during the 14th-century. There are small glimpses of the original Almohad palace on the Patio del Yeso, for instance.

REAL ALCAZAR

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This colossal monument was built for the Ibero-American Exposition in 1929 and stands within the Maria Luisa Park. It’s a semi-circular plaza edged by a canal and overlooked by a large, curved palace. The palace contains many of the city’s administrative buildings, but the reason to visit is to walk beneath the gallery. You’ll see busts of important national figures but also little installations for every province in Spain. Using typical Sevillian azulejos (painted tiles) these displays showcase details like the local food and famous monuments in each part of the country.

PLAZA DE ESPAÑA

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The largest green space in central Seville originally belonged to the nearby San Telmo Palace, dating to the 1500s. In the late-19th century the grounds were donated to the city by Infanta Luisa Fernanda and took their present shape after a remodel in 1911. Maria Luisa is one of those parks with a pleasant surprise down every path, whether it’s an ornamental pond, pavilion, sculpture or tiled fountain. The park’s broad avenues have twin-rows of tall palm trees, while the body of the park, woven with little trails, is a large botanical garden with unusual species from around the world.

MARIA LUISA PARK

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On the left bank of the Guadalquivir, opposite the old city is the Triana neighbourhood. This is an earth part of the city, credited for many of the things people associate with Sevillian culture, like painted ceramics and flamenco. The main way in is via the Isabel Bridge close to the bullfighting arena. You’ll arrive at the Plaza de Altozano, which has a much-photographed statue of a flamenco dancer, a “monument to the flamenco art”. Check out the area’s Moorish revival and baroque architecture and pop into one of the many tile and ceramics shops for authentic azulejos tiles.

TRIANA

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No matter the time of year you can be sure that there will be flamenco shows happening across the city on any evening. A tablao is a good way to watch a show, with live musicians and either a bar or restaurant service. If you’re staying near the Cathedral then Tablao El Arenal would be a good option, with two performances a night (each lasting 90 minutes) and a choice of tapas or full dinner. People visiting Seville in spring or autumn can catch the Peñas de Guardia, a series of shows organised for local or up-and-coming flamenco talent.

FLAMENCO SHOW

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This attraction is part of ensemble built for the Ibero-American Exposition, collecting the most important artefacts from the archaeological sites around the Seville Province. The most exciting finds are from the Bronze Age: For example, dating to the 8th century BC is Treasure of El Carombolo. This hoard belonged to either the local Tartessos Culture that lived on the banks of the Guadalquivir River, or to the Phoenicians. It’s a hoard of 21 pieces of gold jewellery, and after replicas had been on display for many years the original items were installed in 2012.

ARCHAEOLOGICAL MUSEUM

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Southwest of Seville, in Los Remedios, are the fairgrounds where this five-day event takes place, beginning on the Tuesday and wrapping up with fireworks on the Sunday. The scene will almost knock you off your feet, where some thousand tents are erected and guys and girls go around in traditional costume. The women will wear the “traje de gitano”, typical polka dot flamenco dresses, while many men will wear the short waistcoats and wide-brimmed hats. During the Fair people will eat, drink and dance traditional Sevillanas until dawn.

FERIA DE ABRIL

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The Holy Week processions in Seville are Spain’s most famous. From Palm Sunday to Easter Sunday sombre penitents will march through the streets wearing sandals, robes and those slightly eerie pointed hoods. These groups belong to brotherhoods attached to churches across the city and will carry large and very decorative floats portraying passion scenes and weeping Virgins. Everything builds up to Maundy Thursday, when the city’s central plazas put up grandstand seating and women attending even dress in black.

SEMANA SANTA
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